Author: Dr. Donna Kelleher

Positive, clicker training with wild one year old Mustang

Mick is the sweetest most reliable horse now but several years ago we were sorting things out! He would try to bite me (that is why I am carrying a whip) and I was trying to train him to the point we could catch him. I wanted him to learn that touch was safe. If you have an aggressive animal,… Read more →

Seattle Times Article Published!

Evaluating our Moral Compass  Published February 8, 2019 “The Greatness of a nation and its moral progress can be judged by the way its animals are treated.” — Mahatma Gandhi A few years ago my husband and I decided to travel, not to discover romantic Italian art or wine or rumble down cobblestone lanes, instead choosing dirt paths through poor… Read more →

Dr. Donna teaches Saturday Dec 1 class, “Canine Nutrition”

We touched on why kibble is not good for dogs or cats, the dangers of treated water, raw versus cooked diets, the role of vitamins and minerals for our canine friends, omega fatty acids and oxidative stresses. I know these sound dry but in an effort to keep up the motivation, we worked on our own breathing. Inhaling up through… Read more →

Dori’s bladder tumor: Disappeared with holistic treatments

Dori’s bladder tumor: Completely disappeared after a year of intensive herbal and holistic remedies. As a side benefit to the holistic protocol, her oral bone resorption seems to be normal too. The surgeons at Animal Surgical Clinic of Seattle would not resect the tumor because it was too close to vital structures. Using several successive ultrasounds through a boarded radiologist,… Read more →

Week in the Life of Holistic Vet:

Hi people! Today I thought I would post a wrap up of cases from this week as a change from the usual posts where I focus on one dog at a time. Four older dog arthritis cases got better:  Some from just chiropractic and acupuncture; some with herbs such as boswellia, corydalis, dogwood and boneset powders in the food, some… Read more →

Bettie’s hyperthyroid reversed

Feline hyperthyroid disease is very common in cats over the age of ten years old.  We think some of the causes may be excess iodine levels in the commercial food, excess halogenation (Bromine, or bromide,  Flouride, Chloride from water and flame retardants) which competitively bumps iodine off receptors in the thyroid gland, excess heavy metals in food and environment, excess… Read more →